#NEU j- students’ report on the#refugee crisis in #Greece

Nice work from Northeastern University journalism students, including a few of my own. Here’s their latest report:

It is a crisis that is testing Greece’s limits. Over five weeks, a team of journalists from Northeastern University traveled oversees to cover the Syrian refugee crisis in a country already beset by economic collapse. The coverage spans from social issues and healthcare to needs as basic as shelter.

The Cats of Naxos: Mobile reporting from Greece, where they have a large population of feral cats

An attempt at mobile reporting from Greece. I used Pinnacle Pro and edited on my tablet. Worked great but offers  only one video track. I had problems with the audio unrelated to the editing software. , I had to wait until I got a computer to get it up on Vimeo because the audio clips was too big and I couldn’t figure out how to compress it on the phone or tablet. Still working on it, and finding that music.

Also, I recorded it off the radio, so unless it’s a traditional folk song, my use is probably a copyright violation. That means I need to change it — stay posted. It shouldn’t  be hard to find some open source Greek bouzouki music.

May 2018 Cats of Naxos from Tinker Ready on Vimeo.

#Presson: #Sources, #Spotlight and survival

first_frontIn today’s Globe, Sacha Pfeiffer pays tribute to Joe Crowley,  and man who told his story of abuse as the hands of a Boston priest for the Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning series:  “A bond of sorts sometimes develops between reporters and people who share with them these kinds of intimate, traumatic stories. That’s probably why Joe and I never fell out of touch.”

You can read the whole piece here. And while you’re at it, think about subscribing to The Globe or your local paper. Digital — about a dollar a day for — paper it doesn’t matter. Do your part to keep good journalism alive.

Posted by Spotlight Movie on Monday, February 29, 2016

She sums it up like this:

Joe Crowley died at age 58 on Easter Sunday, a date that can’t help but feel symbolic, his body finally surrendering to his illnesses. He passed away in an apartment he had recently moved into in Brookline, a private residence run by the Pine Street Inn homeless shelter.

“Sacha, I’m so loving my new place,” he wrote in August. “It’s so quiet. Such a beautiful street . . . and completely refurbished. One can still smell the fresh paint on the walls.”

No matter what situation he found himself in, he was determined to persevere.

It was an honor to know you, Joe Crowley. You made me laugh. You helped me understand the lasting trauma of sex abuse and the power of human will. And you emboldened countless other survivors to release their painful secrets and reclaim their lives.

That is a life well-lived.