Data on #news consumption and #macrotrends confirms what we know, but offers surprises

From the news futurists at Columbia:

On June 21, the Tow Center hosted “Digital News in a Distributed Environment” at Columbia Journalism School, which featured the US launch of the Reuters Institute for the StuCapturedy of Journalism’s 2016 Digital News Report, as well as the release of preliminary findings from a new research project by the Tow Center examining the relationship between social platforms and publishers.

The Report, which is the largest ongoing international study about news consumption, supports what we know about the growth of smartphones and social media for finding news, but also looks below these macro trends to reveal a number of surprising results about how people consume news worldwide.

Confession. I’ve not watched the three hour video. But, here it is.

Students! Verfiy! And don’t let this happen to you.

The Rolling Stone rape story disaster and the cases below illustrate what separates professional journalism from the rest of the Internet: VERIFICATION!

Well, one  of them came from a working journalist who must have missed that class.

This group was attending the Xmas tree lighting, not the protest. Protest is behind them.

Here’s the original cut line in the Globe:

Protesters stood behind people watching the annual tree lighting ceremony on the Boston Common.

As widely reported, a Harvard Business School prof was skewered online after browbeating a Chinese restaurant for overcharging him $4. Boston.com write a post about  hacked email with racists rants that looked like it came from the prof. Turns out his twitter feed had been hacked.

In the what you were thinking category. As if the fake email story  weren’t  bad enough…

An editor for the Boston Globe’s Boston.com who wrote an unverified story accusing a Harvard professor of firing off a “racist” email is facing scrutiny for peddling T-shirts mocking him for a flap over a $4 Chinese food charge.

Boston.com deputy editor Hilary Sargent designed the T-shirt, which was posted for sale for $20.95 on Internet shopping site Zazzle.com, Boston.com confirmed yesterday.

Aimed at Harvard Business School professor Ben Edelman, the T-shirt carried the words “Didn’t go to HBS. Also didn’t lose my (expletive) over FOUR dollars.”