NYTimes on how they got the Trump Jr./ Russia meeting story.

With such strong feelings on the right and the left about the quality of reporting from the legacy media, it can be a challenge to teach journalism these days. It’s easy to say something that a student can interpret as biased. So, I welcome all views in my classes, but I ask that we have a fact-based debate over the credibility of the press and that we be allowed to disagree with each other in a civil way. As Gumby and Pokey say:

gumby facts.jpeg

 

That said, the Times has published a how-we-got the story piece. Check it out here .  Know that Trump has charged that the anonymous sources are fabricated. I disagree, but would be happy to consider evidence to the contrary.

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Data on #news consumption and #macrotrends confirms what we know, but offers surprises

From the news futurists at Columbia:

On June 21, the Tow Center hosted “Digital News in a Distributed Environment” at Columbia Journalism School, which featured the US launch of the Reuters Institute for the StuCapturedy of Journalism’s 2016 Digital News Report, as well as the release of preliminary findings from a new research project by the Tow Center examining the relationship between social platforms and publishers.

The Report, which is the largest ongoing international study about news consumption, supports what we know about the growth of smartphones and social media for finding news, but also looks below these macro trends to reveal a number of surprising results about how people consume news worldwide.

Confession. I’ve not watched the three hour video. But, here it is.

Facebook changes will impact the future of journalism, and not necessarily in a bad way

Lots happening this summer. Could social media save journalism? Keep up here.

First note: We are changing the way we write headlines –more words, information and a little tease.

Screen Shot 2016-07-03 at 11.04.14 AMNot: Facebook changes to impact news sites

Instead: Facebook changes will impact the future of journalism, and not necessarily in a bad way

Well, maybe not yet: Facebook users are rebelling against clickbait with one of the only tools they have

On Facebook: A few links and an excerpt from NPR

The New York Times

New Yorker

Ad Week: Apparently going on for a while. 

Read on here from NPR media critic David Folkenflik.  He notes that Facebook started as a way to connect with other college student, then moved into the mainstream. It became a way to keep up with family and friends.

Now, a lot of, you know, publishers, news organizations, media outlets have really come to rely on Facebook in a lot of way. And we should say NPR has a financial arrangement with Facebook. The Wall Street Journal has reported that it’s to the tune of $1.2 million a year to produce what are called Facebook Live, these live-stream videos. So there are ways in which there’s these entanglements, and people have come to rely on Facebook in the media world….

This will impact on stories that are posted in the official Facebook accounts and pages of the news organizations. So take NPR’s, we’ve got just shy of 5 million people who have liked the page. That means they receive notifications when we post things. And that’s going to be pushed down in the list of priorities.

His sources say: (O)ur stories are still going to be built to be as viral as ever. If your cousin Millie shares a story, that story is going to be very much in your feed. It’s that if NPR shares it, it will not be quite as prominently placed. They used to perhaps over-promote it. Now they’re going to reduce it back that. 

Rescheduled:LinkedIn as a reporting tool: Webinar for working #journalists

NOTE: This event has been rescheduled for June 20.

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I’m always pitching this to my students. I need a review myself. LinkedIn can be a great reporting tool.

UPCOMING JUNE LINKEDIN FOR JOURNALISTS WEBINARS

Hi! Mark your calendars for our next training dates. To join our live sessions, please click on the Webex links on the day of the webinar, register online, and follow the instructions. Thanks and we hope you can join us!
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GLOBAL SESSION: Monday June 13, 20  2016 9aPT/12pET

To join the online global session:

1. Go to https://linkedin.webex.com/linkedin/j.php?MTID=m1248163aba77d10fce734e63d2a89f0e
2. Enter your name and email address
3. Enter the meeting password: 12345
4. Click “Join”
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen

To avoid incomplete registration: Please be on time and please join the web portion (so you can see my desktop) of the meeting before dialing into the teleconference line (so you can listen along). You’ll be prompted with the dial-in information upon entering the web portion of the meeting.

ASIA-PACIFIC (APAC) SESSION: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 130p (UTC/GMT +9)
***Please note the June 15, 130p time is local Japan time. This webinar is reserved for news journalists who live and work in Asia-Pacific. If you’re based outside of APAC, please join our global session on June 13.***
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Time:
10:00am (GMT +5:30 / Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore time)
12:30pm (GMT +8 / Hong Kong, Singapore, Beijing time)
1:30pm (GMT +9 / Tokyo time)
2:30pm or 3:30pm (GMT +10 or 11 / Sydney time)

To join the online APAC session:

1. Go to: https://goo.gl/3YMvhA
2. Enter your name and email address
3. Enter the meeting password: 2016
4. Click “Join”
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen

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These trainings are for current professional news journalists and freelancers who work for mainstream news media outlets. Thank you

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